Photo
Photo
awyiss

awyiss

(Source: generic-art, via ocelott)

Quote
"If systems of policing, the police, are everywhere, then the point is to make our own work, our practices, as free from such policing as possible, not because unrestrained thought or action is always right (quite the contrary) but because, under scrupulous policing, nothing new can be produced, except perhaps evasions. Indeed the right to make mistakes and to be wrong is just as important — perhaps more so — than the right to be accorded the status of knowledge."

— Elizabeth Grosz, Space, Time, and Perversion: Essays on the Politics of Bodies

(Source: lovevoltaireusapart, via egoisme-a-deux)

Quote
"The purpose of understanding your privilege isn’t to make you feel something. Not guilt, not shame, not anything else. It’s to help you understand that you have a set of things you take for granted that other people don’t have, so that you can change the way you act."

tacit: Some thoughts on privilege: Look, it isn’t about your guilt.

(Source: brutereason, via tusha)

Quote
"Once labeled a felon, you can be subjected to all forms of discrimination that once applied to African-Americans during the Jim Crow era. You may be denied the right to vote, you’re automatically excluded from juries, and you’re legally discriminated against in employment, housing, access to education, and public benefits, relegated to a second-class status much like… your parents or grandparents may have been."

Michelle Alexander 

An estimated 5.3 million Americans have currently or permanently lost their right to vote because of felony convictions. But for black men, the rate is seven times the national average.”

(Source: america-wakiewakie, via bellemaddox)

Photo

(Source: strangegender, via inthenihil)

Quote
"The pain we feel in separation is the price we pay for love."

— Hatef Mokhtar, The Red Wrath

(Source: fables-of-the-reconstruction, via unpunk)

Photo
Photo
Quote
"The archetype of the witch is long overdue for celebration. Daughters, mothers, queens, virgins, wives, et al. derive meaning from their relation to another person. Witches, on the other hand, have power on their own terms. They have agency. They create. They praise. They commune with nature/ Spirit/God/dess/Choose-your-own-semantics, freely, and free of any mediator. But most importantly: they make things happen. The best definition of magic I’ve been able to come up with is “symbolic action with intent" — “action" being the operative word. Witches are midwives to metamorphosis. They are magical women, and they, quite literally, change the world."

The Year of the Witch | Pamela J. Grossman

(via onethousandtwo)